Sep
17
2014

Reblogged from dyannehs :

The Red Shoes, 1948.

(Source: venusinfleurx)

Sep
17
2014

Reblogged from stravaganza :

akalle:

Rare vintage photograph of an onna-bugeisha, one of the female warriors of the upper social classes in feudal Japan (emerged before Samurai)
An onna-bugeisha (女武芸者?) was a type of female warrior belonging to the Japanese upper class. Many wives, widows, daughters, and rebels answered the call of duty by engaging in battle, commonly alongside samurai men. They were members of the bushi (samurai) class in feudal Japan and were trained in the use of weapons to protect their household, family, and honor in times of war. They also represented a divergence from the traditional “housewife” role of the Japanese woman. They are sometimes mistakenly referred to as female samurai, although this is an oversimplification. Onna bugeisha were very important people in ancient Japan. Significant icons such as Empress Jingu, Tomoe Gozen, Nakano Takeko, and Hōjō Masako were all onna bugeisha who came to have a significant impact on Japan.

akalle:

Rare vintage photograph of an onna-bugeisha, one of the female warriors of the upper social classes in feudal Japan (emerged before Samurai)

An onna-bugeisha (女武芸者?) was a type of female warrior belonging to the Japanese upper class. Many wives, widows, daughters, and rebels answered the call of duty by engaging in battle, commonly alongside samurai men. They were members of the bushi (samurai) class in feudal Japan and were trained in the use of weapons to protect their household, family, and honor in times of war. They also represented a divergence from the traditional “housewife” role of the Japanese woman. They are sometimes mistakenly referred to as female samurai, although this is an oversimplification. Onna bugeisha were very important people in ancient Japan. Significant icons such as Empress Jingu, Tomoe Gozen, Nakano Takeko, and Hōjō Masako were all onna bugeisha who came to have a significant impact on Japan.

Sep
16
2014

Reblogged from thehttydblog :

"The world is full of nice people. If you can’t find one, be one."

Unknown (via psych-facts)

Sep
16
2014

Reblogged from stravaganza :

diazrar:

i cant get over these pictures omg thats some rl disney bullshit right there

image

(Source: champagnepuppies)

Sep
15
2014

Reblogged from rhoeysama :

cosenangel:

Credit/rebloggable versions: [x] [x] [x] [x] [x] [x] [x] [x] 

Enjoy~

Sep
15
2014

Reblogged from yakfrost :

devilthrones:

"For one thing, there’s Dido’ fetishization by the two Ashford brothers. While one brother sees her simply as an exotic "other" whom he can bed without forming attachments — very different from the attitude toward white women of the same time period, whose virtue was unequivocal and untouchable — the other is downright violent in his conception of Dido, calling her "repulsive" but still expressing a desire to rape her. The scenes in which that older, more violent Ashford brother addresses Dido directly, giving voice to his unbridled racism and at one point assaulting her, are indisputably disturbing, not just because they represent a disgusting and brutal history but because I see remnants of those attitudes today in the way the world perceives the bodies of black and brown women: exotic, sexual, sensual, different objects. We see it in the way Miley Cyrus and almost any given white pop star (Justin Timberlake and Robin Thicke, for example) use black women’s bodies as props in music videos: as something to be appropriated and used for one’s own pleasure and then cast off in pursuit of the next trend. In addition, the rape of black women still does not seem to carry much horror in 2014; it was most recently a punchline on Saturday Night Live, and last year Russell Simmons was forced to apologize for his highly offensive "Harriet Tubman Sex Tape." None of this is too different from the way the Ashford brothers perceive Dido’s body: as an exotic "other" not worthy of love or respect but merely of lust, and lust framed in a particularly problematic racism."

 Belle: A Lesson in the Timelessness of Racism and Misogyny Against Black Women by Olivia Cole 

Sep
14
2014

Reblogged from hiilikedragons :

doctaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa:

IT’S FUNNY BECAUSE HIS VOICE ACTOR IS JON SNOW

Sep
14
2014

Reblogged from fuckyeahlilyevans :

a friendly reminder

beahbeah:

marfmellow:

that calling women of color exotic is

  • fucking racist
  • dehumanizing
  • othering
  • and not a fucking compliment

image

(x)

Sep
13
2014

Reblogged from senashenta :

Favourite Moments from Cosmos: A SpaceTime Odyssey (4/?)

- From Episode 2: Some of the Things That Molecules Do

(Source: child-of-thecosmos)

Sep
13
2014

Reblogged from avannak :

pokeybooks13:

sadtrashbuckybarnes:

disneys-always-first:

Never not reblog

One thing that always bothered me about that picture of mulan, more than the obvious artifice which is pretty out of character, is the colour of her outfit. The general consensus seems to be that mulan took place in the Northern Wei dynasty, but during the Tang Dynasty which preceded it, the colour yellow, especially bright yellow, had become the exclusive domain of the Emperor. And in those times disrespect to the Emperor could cost you your head at best and the lives of you and your entire family at worst. So, y know, maybe don’t put her in yellow clothes.

I love the history side if tumblr

(Source: fascinationanimation)

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